What Are Health Risks of Vaping CBD?

By Roger Chriss, PNN Columnist

An outbreak of lung illnesses linked to vaping is raising important questions about the safety of vaping cannabis products. The cause is still unclear, but the CDC reports about 76% percent of the patients who became ill vaped products containing THC – the psychoactive ingredient in cannabis. Only about 17% reported vaping a cannabidiol (CBD) product.

At present, very little is known about CBD vaping safety. The World Health Organization’s 2017 report on cannabidiol looked at oral, sublingual and intranasal routes of administration. When the WHO wrote that “CBD is generally well tolerated with a good safety profile,” it was not considering vaping at all.

The Food and Drug Administration still considers CBD in food and drugs sold commercially to be illegal, unless the product falls under the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act. Vaping CBD does not, and so there has been no testing or regulatory action.

There have been no good human studies on CBD vaping. Research generally looks at CBD in edibles and liquids, or smoked using traditional means.

It is not known what happens to CBD under vaping temperatures, if there are thermal degradants, or important chemical reactions between CBD and other ingredients in vaping liquids or other drugs.

A recent lung tissue study found concerning results about inhaling CBD while using steroids. CBD helps reduce inflammation, but “acts as an antagonist with steroids, overriding the anti-inflammatory potential of steroids when used in combination.”

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Last year Vice reported on public health warnings in North Carolina after 90 people became sick with headaches, nausea, hallucinations and other health problems after vaping CBD products. Adulterants appear to have been the problem, and Vice noted that vape oils are poorly regulated and sometimes contain chemicals that “when heated in a vape and inhaled, can cause serious lung irritation.”

A recent study on the quality of CBD liquids used in e-cigarettes is also concerning, finding that “the quality control of manufacturers and the relative safety of these products is uncertain.”

An AP investigation last month found that in lab tests on 30 CBD vape products, ten samples contained synthetic marijuana such as K2 or spice, while others had no CBD at all.

Some states with legalized cannabis do require testing of CBD vapes. But it’s not clear what to test for, and even the lab methods for testing have yet to be validated. It is also not known which cutting agents, adulterants and contaminants should be cause for concern. Lung tissue is fragile, vulnerable in ways the GI tract is not, and not well studied. So testing regimes may ultimately require information we currently lack.

Oversight of cannabis testing is limited. California’s Sequoia Analytical Labs was found to be falsifying lab results last year. Plus, many CBD vapes come from the gray or black markets, or are home-brewed, making attempts at quality control irrelevant. As a result, CBD vaping safety is an open question, assuming it is even possible to make a safe CBD vape.

Fortunately, new research may help. Researchers are testing vaporized cannabis extracts on rats. This will allow for studying the effects of THC and CBD in animal models in a way that closely mimics human behavior.

Such information is urgently needed. Animal studies on vaping are raising concerns about lung cancer risk, but such research may not be representative of how humans vape, limiting their value.

There is ongoing debate on what CBD is good for. And now we also have to consider how CBD should be administered. It may be possible to create a low-risk CBD vape product. But at present we don’t really know how to do it.

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Roger Chriss lives with Ehlers Danlos syndrome and is a proud member of the Ehlers-Danlos Society.

Roger is a technical consultant in Washington state, where he specializes in mathematics and research.

The information in this column is for informational purposes only and represents the author’s opinions alone. It does not inherently express or reflect the views, opinions and/or positions of Pain News Network.