Lawyer Calls for DOJ to End ‘Indiscriminate Raids’ on Doctors

By Pat Anson, PNN Editor

In recent years, hundreds of physicians, pharmacists and addiction treatment doctors have had their offices raided and searched by DEA agents.

Many of the raids were orchestrated by the Justice Department’s Opioid Fraud and Abuse Detection Unit, a special team of investigators created in 2017 to mine opioid prescribing data to identify suspicious orders and practices. The investigations have resulted in the high-profile arrests of healthcare providers for fraud and risky opioid prescribing.

"If you're a doctor and you want to act like a drug dealer, we're going to treat you like one. And sometimes the only difference between a doctor and a drug dealer is a white coat," U.S. Attorney Jay Town said about a federal takedown in April that resulted in charges against 60 practitioners in seven states.

Rarely publicized are the cases where criminal charges are never filed because the evidence against doctors is weak or non-existent.

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“It’s quite frustrating to see how their careers were ruined even though they never faced criminal charges. That’s because the government was incapable of bringing credible charges against them,” says attorney Michael Barnes, who is managing partner at DCBA Law & Policy, a law firm that advises healthcare providers. “When I read a criminal complaint, what I would see as ‘best practices’ is construed as criminal exploitative behavior on the part of the prosecutors.

“There’s a heavy bias against medications to treat pain and opioid use disorder that is driving some of the aggressive enforcement actions. Also, an overzealousness combined with a lack of understanding of the practice of medicine.”

Barnes recently wrote an op/ed, published online by American University’s Washington College of Law, calling for an end to the DOJ’s “indiscriminate raids” on doctors.

“DOJ raids and searches of professionals’ homes and medical clinics interrupt the delivery of health care, put patients’ lives at risk, and unjustly destroy careers and livelihoods. They also create confusion and fear,” wrote Barnes. “Not all health care professionals subject to the DOJ’s searches and seizures are ‘dirty docs.’ In fact, some of them are nationally recognized leaders not just in pain management, but also in addiction medicine.” 

Barnes cites the case of Dr. Stuart Gitlow, an addiction psychiatrist whose Rhode Island home and office were raided by FBI agents in March 2018. Sixteen months later, the reasons for the raid remain unclear and Gitlow, the former president of the American Society of Addiction Medicine, has not been charged with a crime.  

MICHAEL BARNES

MICHAEL BARNES

Neither has Dr. Forest Tennant. In November 2017, DEA agents raided the office and home of Tennant, a prominent California pain physician who was flagged for “very suspicious prescribing patterns.” In a search warrant, the 76-year old Tennant was depicted as the kingpin of a drug trafficking organization that spanned several states.

“I know based on my training and experience that patients traveling long distances to obtain controlled substance prescriptions is another ‘red flag’ of drug abuse and addiction,” wrote DEA investigator Stephanie Kolb, who led a two-year investigation of Tennant.

But Kolb, who was self-employed as a dog walker and pet groomer before she started working for the DEA in 2012, failed to note that Tennant only treated intractable pain patients, many from out-of-state, and often prescribed high doses of opioids because of their chronically poor health. Some patients were in palliative care and near death, and one committed suicide after learning of the raid, fearing she would lose access to opioid medication.

Tennant denies any wrongdoing and was never formally charged, but retired from clinical practice a few months after the raid.

“It’s hard to continue operating when they never closed my case, and so I’m going to retire and move on,” Tennant told PNN at the time. “That’s on the advice of both my lawyers and my doctors."

(Dr. Tennant and the Tennant Foundation have given financial support to Pain News Network and are currently sponsoring PNN’s Patient Resources section.)  

Biased Investigations

Barnes says the biases of some prosecutors extends to the expert witnesses they hire to help build their cases. The role of these witnesses is important because they help DOJ persuade judges to sign off on search warrants that are key to gathering evidence. It’s a lucrative sideline for some paid witnesses, who charge the government hundreds of dollars an hour for their time and expertise.

“Expert witnesses are eager to give DOJ business to get the expert witness fees, and they of course will help to spin the facts in a way that is prejudicial to the defendant,” Barnes said. “What we’re seeing here is people who are really not qualified to be making assessments of other practices serving as experts for the government.” 

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Dr. Timothy Munzing, a Kaiser Permanente family practice physician in California, has worked as a medical consultant for the DEA, FBI and DOJ on over 100 investigations, most of which involve prescriptions for opioids and other controlled substances.

According to GovTribe.com, which tracks payments to federal contractors, Munzing has been awarded nearly $1 million in DOJ contracts since 2017 and is currently working on nearly two dozen DEA investigations, mostly reviewing patient files and data from prescription drug monitoring programs.

It would be unusual for a family practice physician to treat an intractable pain patient without making a referral to a pain or palliative care specialist. But Munzing was one of the expert witnesses hired by the DEA to analyze Tennant’s prescribing.

“I find to a high level of certainty that after review of the medical records… that Dr. Tennant failed to meet the requirements in prescribing these dangerous medications,” Munzing wrote in an affidavit. “These prescribing patterns are highly suspicious for medication abuse/and or diversion. If the patients are actually using all the medications prescribed, they are at high risk for addiction, overdose, and death.”  

Munzing’s affidavit and the DEA search warrant identified no patients who were actually harmed while under Tennant’s care. As PNN reported, some patients found the allegation that they were selling their medication and funneling the profits back to Tennant laughable.      

“It’s like everything else they do. They don’t talk to any patients. They don’t talk to any doctors. They just go and throw all this stuff out there and making all these incriminations against people. They don’t have any evidence that I’ve sold anything. It’s just ludicrous,” said Ryle Holder, a Tennant patient who lives in Georgia.  

Barnes says the bias against opioid prescribing “is inherent in the work of many of the investigators and prosecutors.”

“Then there is the incompetence as it relates to many of the law enforcement officers not having the medical expertise to make judgements of a medical nature. And then, when they do consult with the experts, those experts are typically trying to please their clients and getting repeat business as a result,” he told PNN. 

State Medical Boards

To bring more expertise into investigations of healthcare providers, Barnes is proposing that state medical boards play a more prominent role. He wants Congress to amend federal law to require DOJ investigators and prosecutors to get a referral from a state licensing board before investigating a practitioner for misconduct. Similar laws at the state level would also need to be changed to require state and local law enforcement to get a referral from a medical licensing board.

To make sure complaints are handled in a timely manner, Barnes says federal funds should be used to bolster the budgets of state licensing boards so they can investigate allegations of misconduct.  

“There are some detractors who say medical boards didn’t do an adequate job leading up to the overdose crisis. But the reality is neither did law enforcement,” Barnes says. “The medical boards could get up to speed and make these assessments on medical needs and patient care to make sure that healthcare providers can be assessed with medical expertise, rather than law enforcement trying to guess about standard of care and best practices.”

“Making it more difficult for law enforcement to investigate potential diversion of dangerous and addictive controlled substances, including powerful painkillers, is probably not going to happen right now,” says DEA spokesman Rusty Payne.

This idea that people need to worry about the DEA hiding in the bushes if they write an oxycodone prescription is ridiculous.
— Rusty Payne, DEA spokesman

Payne points out the DEA is both a law enforcement and regulatory agency, one that oversees 1.3 million practitioners licensed to prescribe controlled substances. He says enforcement actions are relatively rare and not “indiscriminate” as Barnes suggests.

“The numbers are incredibly low. It is a very, very, very small number.  So this idea that people need to worry about the DEA hiding in the bushes if they write an oxycodone prescription is ridiculous,” he told PNN. “We don’t have the resources. We don’t track individual prescriptions. We look for patterns and large-scale significant diversion.”  

Getting state medical boards involved, according to Payne, is not a good idea.

“I don’t think making it harder for us to scrutinize those that are acting outside the law is in anyone’s best interest,” he said.

But Barnes’ proposal makes sense, according to Dr. Lynn Webster, a PNN columnist and former president of the American Academy of Pain Medicine. 

“Barnes makes a sensible recommendation. If the law enforcement suspects a provider is not complying with the law, then the first step should be a referral to the medical board where the provider can be evaluated by their peers,” Webster said. “If a doctor goes to trial, they will not be evaluated by their peers. That is not the way the justice system is supposed to work.” 

Webster was once the target of a federal investigation of his opioid prescribing practices and DEA agents raided his Utah pain clinic in 2010. Four years later, the DOJ said it would not prosecute Webster, who said his “reputation was tarnished forever.”  

“DEA investigations are often designed to entrap a provider on technicalities.  Even if an investigation never leads to any charges the doctor's reputation is damaged.  In the court of public opinion an investigation must mean something was wrong,” Webster said.