Ambroxol: A Potential New Treatment for Chronic Pain

By A Rahman Ford, PNN Columnist

Researchers say a drug long used in cough syrup and cold medicines shows potential for treating some types of neuropathic pain.

A small study recently published in the journal Headache found that topical administration of ambroxol in a cream could significantly decrease pain in patients with trigeminal neuralgia, a chronic facial condition that can make even routine tasks such as brushing one’s teeth excruciatingly painful. 

In their review of the medical records of five trigeminal neuralgia patients, German researchers reported that all five patients experienced pain reduction with ambroxol 20% cream being applied within 30 minutes of a pain flare, with pain relief lasting from 4 to 6 hours.  In one case, pain was eliminated completely in one week.  

The results were similar to those of previous German studies and were so significant that researchers recommended that ambroxol “should be investigated further as a matter of urgency.”

Similarly, a recent study in the journal Pain Management found that application of topical ambroxol reduced spontaneous pain in several patients with complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS), a little understood nerve condition that causes chronic pain after a significant injury or surgery.  Notably, ambroxol therapy improved several other neuropathy-related conditions in CRPS patients, including edema, allodynia, hyperalgesia, skin reddening, motor dysfunction and skin temperature.

An Old Drug with a New Purpose

With a pharmacological history that can be traced back to Indian ayurvedic medicine, ambroxol was initially approved in 1978 as a medication to break down mucus and make it easier to eliminate by coughing.  It is generally administered in tablet or syrup form. 

Ambroxol is also used to treat a sore throat associated with pharyngitis, thus its potential role as a potent local anesthetic.  The drug’s anesthetic properties stem from its ability to block sodium and calcium channels that transmit pain signals.

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Although the idea that ambroxol can treat a sore throat is widely accepted, its application to other forms of pain is more recent.  

Previous studies using animal models of neuropathic pain have been promising.  In a 2005 study, researchers effectively reduced – and in some cases eliminated – chronic neuropathic and inflammatory pain in rats. Indian researchers also found ambroxol effective in treating neuropathic pain in rats, attributing its success to its antioxidative and anti-inflammatory properties.  Unfortunately, human studies are few at this point.

Ambroxol and Fibromyalgia

A 2017 Clinical Rheumatology study showed that ambroxol can play a key role in treating chronic pain associated with fibromyalgia.  As reported by Fibromyalgia News Today, researchers from Mexico added ambroxol to the treatment regimens of 25 fibromyalgia patients, three times a day for one month.  At the end of the study, pain scores decreased significantly and there was also noticeable improvement in sleep disturbances, stiffness and autonomic nervous system dysfunction.  No major adverse events were reported. 

Another 2017 study supported these findings, with the authors concluding that “fibromyalgia treatment with ambroxol should be systematically investigated” because the drug “is the only treatment option used thus far that has the potential to address not just individual but all of the aforementioned aspects of pain.”

Although data on its effectiveness in humans are limited, ambroxol shows great potential in treating painful conditions for which there are currently few safe and effective options.  It is particularly attractive because it has few significant side effects, is not addictive and can be administered topically in some instances.

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A. Rahman Ford, PhD, is a lawyer and research professional. He is a graduate of Rutgers University and the Howard University School of Law, where he served as Editor-in-Chief of the Howard Law Journal. He earned his PhD at the University of Pennsylvania.

Rahman lives with chronic inflammation in his digestive tract and is unable to eat solid food.

The information in this column should not be considered as professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. It is for informational purposes only and represent the author’s opinions alone. It does not inherently express or reflect the views, opinions and/or positions of Pain News Network.

Scrambler Therapy Helped My Daughter Walk Again

By Reggie Greening, Guest Columnist

Beginning in August 2017, my daughter Amanda began having severe pain in her left foot after spraining her ankle. She was 20 years old at the time and described the pain as feeling as though her bones were being crushed by a red-hot anvil.

Over the next few months, Amanda started having more and more symptoms. It began with sharp pain, then discoloration, and severe swelling set in. This was about the time when she stopped being able to walk and had to be put on opioid medication in an attempt to manage the pain.

The bone crushing sensation began around the end of September, followed closely by burning pain. Amanda was still unable to walk and was taking opioids every four to six hours like clockwork. No one could figure out what was wrong or how to manage the pain other than with opioids.

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While attempting to get a diagnosis, Amanda went through many rounds of testing. She had multiple x-rays, two MRIs (one with contrast dye injected intravenously), a three-phase bone scan, a nerve conductivity test, and two phases of bloodwork examined. She also went to a plethora of doctors, including a podiatrist, orthopedist, rheumatologist, dermatologist, physical therapists, homeopathic physician, chiropractor, pain management doctor, and a general medicine doctor.

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The podiatrist and one of her physical therapists suspected Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS), and her podiatrist was the one who eventually determined the diagnosis of CRPS on February 16, 2018.

This spurred my research to find a more sustainable treatment option for Amanda. I spent hours searching online before discovering Scrambler Therapy.

I found a physician in New Jersey who posted videos on YouTube about Scrambler Therapy (also known as Calmare Pain Relief Therapy) and its benefits for those suffering with CRPS and other chronic nerve conditions.

We live in Louisiana, so I looked for a doctor who had a Scrambler Therapy machine closer to our home state. I eventually found a doctor in Dallas who has a machine in his office.

Amanda’s first round of treatment was administered by an osteopathic doctor in March 2018. After the fourth consecutive day of treatment, she was able to walk with the aid of crutches for the first time in seven months. The next day, after her fifth treatment, Amanda was able to walk independently. By the end of her initial round of treatment, she was entirely off opioids and NSAID pain relievers.

Our local TV station did a story about Amanda’s recovery.

Right now, the Scrambler treatment is not covered by insurance and payment for it adds up rather quickly. I am trying to get this therapy more widely acknowledged and known about so that it may become an option for others suffering with chronic neuropathic pain.

I have seen the benefits of Scrambler Therapy firsthand in my daughter. At the time of this writing, Amanda has been off opioids for two months and has been able to maintain the benefits of the initial treatment through booster treatments as needed.

Scrambler Therapy has the potential to help not just those suffering from CRPS (for whom pain relief often seems distant and hopeless), but also for those suffering from other neuropathic pain conditions.

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The Greening family lives in Shreveport, Louisiana.

Pain News Network invites other readers to share their stories with us. Send them to editor@painnewsnetwork.org.

The information in this column should not be considered as professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. It is for informational purposes only and represents the author’s opinions alone. It does not inherently express or reflect the views, opinions and/or positions of Pain News Network.

Can Hypnosis Help Relieve Chronic Pain?

By Pat Anson, PNN Editor

Two new studies suggest that hypnotherapy can relieve pain for some patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) and other chronic pain conditions.

The first study, published in The Lancet medical journal, involved nearly 500 IBS patients who were recruited from 11 hospitals in the Netherlands. IBS is a common condition characterized by repeated attacks of stomach pain, cramps, diarrhea and constipation.

Study participants were randomly assigned to one of three groups: individual hypnotherapy, group hypnotherapy, or support sessions that included dietary advice and education about IBS.  The hypnotherapy sessions were designed to reduce pain and discomfort from IBS.

After three months, 41% of the people in individual hypnotherapy and 33% of those in group hypnotherapy reported adequate relief, compared to less than 17% of those in education and support sessions.   

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The results from group hypnotherapy were even better after 9 months. Nearly half the patients in that group reported relief from IBS symptoms.

“The trial finding that hypnotherapy works better than educational support adds evidence to previous studies showing that hypnotherapy may have a helpful effect,” the UK’s National Health Service said in a review of the Dutch study. “The finding that group hypnotherapy works about as well as individual hypnotherapy is interesting, as this means many people could be treated by the same therapist at the same time, which could reduce waiting times and the cost of treatment.

“It also demonstrates that unfortunately, even with the best care, IBS can still be a difficult condition to treat. Half or more people receiving hypnotherapy still gained no symptom relief.”

Hypnosis and CRPS

Another hypnosis study, recently reported by Japanese researchers at the World Congress of Pain, involved 121 patients with refractory chronic pain – also known as intractable pain – who agreed to hypnotherapy either biweekly or in monthly 60 minute sessions. The patients all had chronic conditions that were difficult to treat, such as CRPS, phantom limb pain, neuropathic pain and cancer pain.

Researchers found that 71% of the patients reported pain relief during the hypnosis sessions. And for many of them, the analgesic effect continued after the session ended.

“These patients have all undergone multidisciplinary pain treatment, including medication, physiotherapy and CBT (cognitive behavioral therapy),” Miyuki Mizutani, PhD, a clinical psychologist at Aichi Medical University, told Pain Medicine News. “And ultimately, they did not respond completely to those treatments. So we believe the untreatable part of the pain can be treated by hypnosis.”

Hypnotherapy even works for patients with CRPS, although they often require more hypnosis sessions before having an analgesic effect.

“I’ve now been performing hypnosis for 18 years, and have found it very effective in those patients, though it can be difficult to administer in chronic pain,” Mizutani said. “It takes time, and complete remission is not very common. However, our experience is that repeated analgesic experiences can lead to long-term improvements in chronic pain.”

A Nightmare Experience With Surgery

By Rochelle Odell, Columnist

I have been warning my “healthy” family and friends that the opioid epidemic and the backlash against prescription opioids would affect them at some point. My recent nightmare of a surgery may prove that the time may now be at hand. 

On February 2, I underwent what normally would be minor surgery to remove a catheter -- called a portacath -- that had become dislodged. For patients with Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS), there is no such thing as a minor procedure and my experience became a prime example of what could go wrong.

My friend Debbie drove me to the hospital where the surgery was performed. I have undergone over 40 procedures for CRPS and I always become apprehensive, as any patient facing surgery should be. I told Debbie I did not have a warm toasty feeling about the surgery. I was frightened, a feeling I don't usually experience. But this time I did.

Before I was taken back to pre-op, Debbie asked me if I would like to pray. Thankful for the thought, I responded yes. It did not alleviate the feeling of dread nagging at me, but I hoped God would protect me.

Once in pre-op, the nurse went over my extensive allergy list. Believe me, it's long. I am allergic to almost all antibiotics, including penicillin, along with some opioids like Demerol and methadone, as well as aspirin and NSAID's. Betadine causes blisters and a horrible rash. I’m also allergic to most medical tape, including cloth, plastic, silk and paper tapes. The only one I can tolerate is Hypafix. It's a soft adhesive that allows the skin to breathe. I was very vocal about that.

The nurse asked what kind of surgery I was about to undergo and why. I told her it was because I don't have any good veins, never have, and that a catheter was a necessary evil. Without one, if I were to pass out or become very ill, dying could be a real possibility.

I told her she would only got two tries for the IV line I would need for surgery. I am not a pin cushion and multiple needle pricks could cause a major pain flare. She started the IV on the second try.

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The surgeon and anesthesiologist then came to see me. I explained how nervous I was and that I honestly was very close to walking out. I should have done that. I could tell the surgeon had no clue what CRPS was or how to treat me post-op. That is not unusual, a lot of doctors have no clue what it is, and that extra steps are needed to keep a major pain flare from happening.

Even the anesthesiologist seemed clueless about CRPS. I thought that odd, since anesthesiologists are often pain management physicians. He kept telling me don't worry, once in the operating room I would be out soon.

Four hours later I was taken to the operating room. I told the anesthesiologist that I forgot to add fentanyl to my allergy list. It gives me a smothering feeling and can't breathe. I also told him I wanted an LMA mask, because being intubated causes my asthma to flare. He told me he would use the mask, but he wanted to use fentanyl and that if I stopped breathing he would intubate me.

What is wrong with this explanation? Use something other than fentanyl and you won't have to intubate me. I also asked the surgeon to place me on IV antibiotics, as I have a long history of staph and MRSA infections.

Upon coming out of anesthesia, my throat was killing me. I knew he must have intubated me and used a drug I didn't want. The pain was excruciating. I was given small doses of Dilaudid and oxycodone, which did absolutely zip for me.

They also gave me IV Tylenol. Really, Tylenol post-op in a CRPS patient? The recovery room nurse was trying to console me as I was in tears.  Any nurse I dealt with said they were trying to make sure I didn't die of an opioid overdose. That took the cake, the minuscule doses I received were obviously not working, so an opioid overdose certainly would not happen.

One nurse told me my pain was emotional pain. I should have screamed at her to get away from me, but I was in so much pain I couldn't think clearly. I was kept for observation overnight, which brought more problems and the realization that the very thing I warned my healthy family and friends about was indeed at hand.

What kind of pain control do patients get now after surgery?  My surgeon was responsible for ordering all my meds, but how is a man who has no clue what CRPS is going to manage my pain? A man I had only seen one time before the surgery.

My RN was very sweet, but she too was stating what I think must be the hospital's policy. They do not want to provide opioid pain management.  Everyone is so convinced the opioid epidemic was and is caused by prescription opioid medication. It dawned on me, ignorance is alive and well and it must be contagious.

My ordeal continued to worsen. I looked at my surgery sites. Not only were my upper chest and right arm covered in the tell-tale orange color from Betadine, but there was medical tape. A big painful and very itchy rash had developed.

My skin was driving me nuts. I asked the nurse to remove the tape and use non-stick pads and Hypafix, but she refused. Didn't anyone read my allergy list? Why ask for one if you are going to ignore it? The surgeon ordered Benadryl cream for my arm. It helped a little and I did get one injection of IV Benadryl, but that was it. I received less medication in the hospital than I was taking at home.

After a long painful night, I told the nurse I would refuse to see the surgeon. Anyone who causes a patient as much pain as he did is one I will not see again. The nurse said he had to see me in order to release me. I told her to tell him to have a different doctor release me, as I did not want to see him. I was livid. The morning I was released I removed the tape, as I could no longer tolerate it. She helped me cover the area with sterile gauze.

As soon as I got home I cleaned the surgery area thoroughly and made an occlusive dressing over the two surgical sites. The next morning my whole upper right chest was covered with tiny blisters and a nasty looking rash. My friend took pictures for me.  The asthma flare I was afraid of was in full swing and I was running a temperature of 102.  I could barely breath and my pain was completely out of control.

I had a temperature for three weeks, and six weeks later I am still coughing up yellow gunk. That could have easily been prevented, but what do I know, I am just the patient.  Because I refused to see the surgeon for a post-op checkup, my primary care provider sent me a letter informing me I was trying to direct my care and was argumentative. He would only treat me for 30 more days and I needed to find a new primary care physician.

In the past I might have been upset with a letter like that, but since this opioid epidemic has affected me so negatively, I simply do not want to be seen by any physician who doesn't try to understand how sick I am. I was in so much pain.  Wouldn't you try to direct your care at that point?

My ordeal has not ended. As of this writing, the whole port area and catheter tubing are swollen and look infected. Have I gotten it checked yet? Nope. I have literally been frozen in place by fear, a fear I have never experienced before. I know this will require more surgery to remove and replace the portacath. Just thinking about it scares me.

All of this could have been avoided if my allergy list had been read, if there had been adequate pain management, and if IV antibiotics had been started. If this is the future of medical care, I may reconsider seeing any doctor. It just isn't worth the stress and pain.

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Rochelle Odell lives in California. She’s lived for nearly 25 years with Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS/RSD).

The information in this column should not be considered as professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. It is for informational purposes only and represents the author’s opinions alone. It does not inherently express or reflect the views, opinions and/or positions of Pain News Network.

Are You Still Hoping for a Cure?

By Rochelle Odell, Columnist

As a 25 year survivor of Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS/RSD), I ask myself all the time if I have lost hope, become too cynical and if reality has finally hit home.

Yes to all three, unfortunately. And I don't like that.

For most chronic pain conditions, there is usually hope for a cure. But for some there is no hope at all -- people just have to learn to live with the outcome and hope there are doctors who know how to treat it accordingly.

When viewing the main CRPS/RSD websites and support groups, hope for a cure is a common thread. But in reality for me and others like me who have lived with this insidious monster for far too long, there truly is no hope. Medical treatment and modalities have changed little in the 25 years I have battled this disease and that concerns me.

Why haven't greater strides been made? Possibly because researchers and scientists just do not fully understand the human brain yet. Until there is a complete understanding of the mechanics of this disease and others like it, hope ends there.

I recently learned from a friend that her physician, a general practitioner, had little respect for anesthesiologists who treated post-surgical pain and how he felt a patient wasn't treated appropriately. So I looked into when pain management became its own medical specialty.

Pain management became the first sub-specialty of anesthesia in 1993, the same year that I was diagnosed with CRPS/RSD. Most pain management specialists are anesthesiologists, but neurologists and psychiatrists can also become board certified in pain management. The training is long and arduous, but they are among the highest paid in the medical profession.  

When my treatment began, my first pain management physician was still learning and I was his all too cooperative guinea pig. I just wanted the CRPS/RSD pain in my left foot to go away. Would I go down that path again? Never.

My outcome may have been much better without all the “minimally invasive” procedures that were attempted. It started with epidural blocks and progressed from there. The more procedures that were done, the faster the CRPS/RSD spread and the worse the pain became. 

I often wonder where the term “minimally invasive” began. Even though doctors may not go deeply into the body, just by going into our spine or brain for whatever reason, they are venturing into the very nerve fiber of every patient. That is not minimal.

I have read where researchers, scientists and even some pain management physicians now believe that all those minimally invasive procedures may in the end do more harm than good.  Do I believe it?  Absolutely!  But that's just me -- although many long term CRPS/RSD patients will admit that it was wrong for them too.  Most just do not go around talking about this other dark side of the pain. 

There are times I want to scream at a patient: DON'T DO IT! EXPLORE ALL YOUR OPTIONS FIRST. AND ABOVE ALL EDUCATE YOURSELF!

But I don't, I temper my tongue.

Many of us don't believe our physicians as we are rushed through an appointment. We may be allotted only about 10-15 minutes. If you haven't written down your questions and concerns first, you soon realize you are sitting in the exam room with your mouth open as the doctor leaves, telling you to pick up your prescription at the front desk, schedule your next appointment or, worse yet, that they will be unable to treat you any longer. 

This type of inadequate treatment, with your pain increasing and no end in sight, is where cynicism soon develops.  It is also when reality hits you smack in the face and you start to question yourself. What in the hell am I doing here?

When clinical trials are started, they are aimed at a specific group of people, often in the early stages of a disease. There is often a large exclusion list, such as those of us who have had CRPS/RSD for many years. New treatments are not being investigated or developed for us, so the standard nerve blocks, injections, surgical procedures and implants are utilized. And now, because of the opioid crisis, more patients than ever are being dropped.

Treating a CRPS/RSD patient has so many variables. What works for one, doesn't work for the other, and what worked yesterday may not work the next day. Treating us has to be a nightmare for any physician.

I do have hope for patients who are newly diagnosed with CRPS/RSD, absolutely. But at this point in time, unless medical advances are developed, they soon will be walking down the same path so many of us long time pain patients or on, when hope is dashed, and cynicism and reality make a grand entrance.

I get tired of hearing the word “hope” as it has no meaning for me. Yet we are continually told to hope for a cure, to be brave, and to develop a positive attitude. Am I all doom and gloom? Not yet. I still smile and laugh.

But when alone in the dark, when reality hits me once again, I cry. 

Rochelle Odell lives in California. She lives with Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS/RSD).

The information in this column should not be considered as professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. It is for informational purposes only and represents the author’s opinions alone. It does not inherently express or reflect the views, opinions and/or positions of Pain News Network.

CDC Opioid Guidelines Are Not Rules or Laws

By Mark Helfand, DDS, Guest Columnist

I am a 62 year old dentist who had to retire 20 years ago due to Chronic Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS). It started in my right forearm and has spread to all four extremities. Recently it has spread into my shoulders, fingers, knees and thighs.

I have seen numerous pain doctors over the years (that's another story) and have finally found a compassionate, intelligent doctor. He has the knowledge and conviction to be a physician and to treat me properly.

I feel sorry for all the other patients suffering as I do, who are being treated by people with medical degrees that are too stupid or too scared to treat their patients as they swore to do when they graduated from medical school.

Have they forgotten the Hippocratic Oath to do no harm?

The CDC opioid prescribing guidelines are just that -- guidelines -- NOT rules or laws. As a matter of fact, here is a quote directly from the guidelines:

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MARK HELFAND

“The recommendations in the guideline are voluntary, rather than prescriptive standards. They are based on emerging evidence, including observational studies or randomized clinical trials with notable limitations. Clinicians should consider the circumstances and unique needs of each patient when providing care."

The so-called "doctors" (and I use the term loosely) that say they cannot prescribe narcotics anymore or cannot prescribe the same dosage, either cannot read, don't care or aren't knowledgeable enough to know what they are doing.

I have had all the past and current mainstream treatments, except hyperbaric oxygen therapy and intravenous ketamine. I have tried and been prescribed most NSAIDs and narcotics.

I am currently taking fentanyl lozenges every three hours as needed and an experimental cream with ketamine that my pharmacist read about in one of his journals.

He sent the paper to me, I brought it to my doctor, we discussed the pros and cons, and my doctor prescribed it for me.

It is helping, but I am not even close to being pain free. However, I am not "stoned" on drugs. If I was, I couldn't write this letter.

I have some semblance of a life and when the pain gets unbearable, I have the ketamine cream and can take the medication I need without having to beg some non-caring doctor in an emergency room. I have been through that and refuse to go through it again.

I genuinely feel sorry for all the chronic pain patients that haven't been as "lucky" as I am. I am cursed with this horrible, excruciatingly painful condition 24/7, but am blessed by a few angels (my pharmacist, my doctor, my niece, and 3 or 4 lay people) that help me live whatever life I have.

I hope this inspires others in my condition to search for their angels.

Dr. Mark Helfand lives in New York.

Pain News Network invites other readers to share their stories with us.  Send them to:  editor@PainNewsNetwork.org

The information in this column should not be considered as professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. It is for informational purposes only and represents the author’s opinions alone. It does not inherently express or reflect the views, opinions and/or positions of Pain News Network.

Waiting for My Pain Medication to Be Stripped Away

By Sheryl Donnell, Guest Columnist

Up until recently, I thought I was coming through this opioid crisis unscathed. My pain management doctor has been with a top clinic for many years and is highly respected and generally above reproach.

We did not have that dreaded conversation virtually everyone else with chronic pain I know has had -- until September 13th, 2016.

That night, I fell and broke 5 bones in my foot, which was already affected with Chronic Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS). The pain was so incredibly severe.

I laid on the floor from 2 am to 10 am before I could stay alert enough, and not pass out from shock and pain, to get to a phone to call my husband upstairs for help (he is deaf in one ear). It took 4 paramedics to get me off the floor and into an ambulance.

Once at the hospital, even though I was writhing in agony and still passing out literally from pain, the doctor never examined me or my foot. She didn't care I had been on an ice cold floor for 6 hours. All she heard was "chronic pain patient" and she was done with me.

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SHERYL DONNELL

I begged her to call the pain experts my doctor worked with so she could get some guidelines for treating me, but she didn't see a reason. I asked if she was familiar with CRPS, and she proudly said no and it didn't matter. She sent me for x-rays. No sooner did I get back in my room from another horrifyingly painful experience did she announce nothing was broken and to go home.

I sat there stunned. I had heard the bones break. I knew there were fractures. I begged the nurses to do something. I had not even been given a single Tylenol. This doctor firmly believed I was a drug seeker and wanted to bounce me.

The nurse started reading my discharge papers, which said, "Come back if you have any of these symptoms." I started crying harder. I said I have every one of those right now! She was practically in tears herself.

Then my husband asked, “What will he do when we get home? We can't even get her into the house!” The nurse told him to call the paramedics again to help get me back inside my home, which we did.

My husband called in 24-hour care workers to help me so I could manage a bit. It was agony going to the bathroom, even with a bedside commode my mother brought.

The following morning, the paramedics came back and helped me into the car. We went downtown for a pain injection to try to stop a progression of my CRPS. While there I insisted on new x-rays, which my pain doctor of 9 years grudgingly agreed to -- mostly to shut me up. He said come back in a week for another shot.

I asked for an increase in my pain medication. My biggest shock that day was his response. He said there was no reason for an increase! What? We went home to 24-hour care and instructions to start weight bearing exercises asap!

A full week later with not a single call, we returned to my pain management doctor for my second injection. He casually mentioned the results of my x-rays, which showed that I had 5 broken bones in my foot. No call for an entire week. I was left to think I was nuts and was trying to bear weight on a severely fractured foot!

I was not offered, nor were my requests for additional pain medication granted. I was told to come in every week for four more weeks (in great agony and great difficulty) for pain injections which did very little. However, I did not have a spread of my CRPS.

I did lose about 8 weeks of my life again. My pain levels were so extreme I did nothing but sit in my recliner and do a lot of crying. And realize how lucky I was to have family support, the ability to pay for 24-hour caregivers, and to be believed I was in the kind of pain I said I was in. My adult daughter moved home for a month to help me and my husband with caregiving duties.

What do other people do?

Even after my 6 weeks of pain injections, when I requested a short term increase in pain medication to help me rehab my still very painful foot once I was cleared by my orthopedist, I was again turned down by my pain management doctor.

It is now 5 months after I broke my foot and I cannot complete my rehabilitation because my pain is still so intense. I know if this had happened 5 years ago, I would not be suffering like this.

Even though my pain has worsened and I need to rehabilitate my injury, the CDC has arbitrarily changed the rules and I must suffer. My doctor's hands are tied.

I lose more and more days spent doing things I enjoy or need to do because the CDC’s “experts” sat in a room and made decisions based on flawed data and street drugs; not real patients who follow the rules of their pain contracts and don't seek out multiple doctors or illegal methods to get medication. I follow all the rules, just like 99.5% of my peers.

We are suffering and living in fear that we will be next to have our medication stripped away from us, through no fault of our own. And then the real terror begins.

Sheryl Donnell lives in Illinois. She suffers from CRPS and fibromyalgia.

Pain News Network invites other readers to share their stories with us.  Send them to:  editor@PainNewsNetwork.org

The information in this column should not be considered as professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. It is for informational purposes only and represents the author’s opinions alone. It does not inherently express or reflect the views, opinions and/or positions of Pain News Network.