Why Do Doctors Keep Pushing Invasive Procedures on Me?

By Mike Emelio, Guest Columnist 

I'm not a cynical person by nature, but I'm seeing a very clear pattern with interventional pain management doctors. Why is it that every doctor I've seen who is certified in interventional pain medicine (at least 8 of them already) demonize opioid medication and insist on pushing their non-FDA approved injections, radiofrequency ablations, pain pumps and spinal cord stimulators? 

This approach is even more absurd when you consider the fact that invasive procedures tend to have low rates of efficacy and are known to create scar tissue and nerve damage, both of which can cause more pain.  

As if this weren't ridiculous enough, in spite of explaining to these doctors how epidural steroid injections not only didn't work for me, but robbed me of my life by tripling my pain and making my condition much worse (see “Disabled by the War on Opioids”), every single one of the doctors I've seen still tries to push more of those injections on me.  

My head spins every time I hear them try to sell me on more injections. Are they deaf, insane, just trying to make their wallets fatter, or all three?

On what planet does it make sense to do more of what made a thing worse

Ever since my life was ruined by those injections 5 years ago, I've been desperately trying to find a doctor who truly cares about my well-being and wants to help me. My search has been fruitless so far.  

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Sadly, it just keeps getting worse. The latest doctor I started seeing keeps pushing a pain pump on me. That is as absurd as it gets. Multiple doctors have told me that the reason those injections made my back pain worse is because they caused adhesive arachnoiditis or nerve damage – both of which can be made worse with invasive procedures.  

Why would any doctor push a pain pump on me? I could understand it for a patient with a history of drug abuse, but that is not the case with me. Not only do I have zero history of drug or alcohol abuse, but I have taken my pain meds responsibly for many years. Why should I submit to being put under anesthesia, cut open and have a device implanted in me, all which can have serious complications, when I can get the same medication in a pill that I took responsibly for many years? 

All of the surgeons say that my best option for improved quality of life is pain medication and staying as active and mobile as possible. Yet every interventional pain management doctor ignores their advice and pushes for injections, spinal cord stimulators or pain pumps. Why would they do that?  

It's simple.  According to my Medicare statements, a doctor makes about $75 per visit to write and maintain prescription medications. But with the injections, it's $1,000 and up!

Many times I've personally seen doctors perform unnecessary tests that pay them a lot of money and only for that reason. This is not just my opinion, as other doctors I've seen have confirmed this. Not all doctors are like this and I wouldn't even venture to say most, but the fact is there are plenty of them out there. 

I'm not saying any of this to bash doctors. I'm sharing this information in hopes that people take the time to get educated, be vigilant and be their own advocate when it comes to their healthcare. Doctors are only human. They're just as susceptible to flaws as anyone else. I can't impress enough on all of you to look out for yourselves and get second, third, fourth and even fifth opinions if needed.

If you think that sounds excessive, just think about what happened to me. They took away what was working for me and used a non-FDA approved procedure on me that wasn't even designed for what they were using it for. The end result was that it crippled me, robbed me of my ability to work, forced me into a life of poverty and disability, and took away my freedom, my dignity and my ability to properly care for myself. 

Simply put... It has devastated my life.

I don't post any this for sympathy. I am only trying to educate and inform people about what can happen if they put too much faith in doctors without doing some research. What happened to me is a prime example of just how essential it is that we patients be as proactive as possible, be our own advocates and protect ourselves. 

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Michael Emelio lives in Florida.

Pain News Network invites other readers to share their stories with us. Send them to editor@painnewsnetwork.org.

The information in this column should not be considered as professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. It is for informational purposes only and represents the author’s opinions alone. It does not inherently express or reflect the views, opinions and/or positions of Pain News Network.

Why Are They Being So Cruel?

By Debbie Duke, Guest Columnist

I am 63 years old and have been on pain meds consistently since the age of 38.  I have systemic lupus and scleroderma, which fortunately is in remission.  I also suffer from gout, fibromuscular dysplasia, scoliosis, kidney pain and post-operative pain from breast cancer surgery.

My experience with pain management doctors in the beginning was very pleasant and I was getting relief from my agony. I was disabled but still functional due to pain medication. 

But recently things have changed.  After several years of using a pain pump, I decided to go back to oral medication to have more control.  The pump was not that effective for breakthrough pain and made me feel disconnected. After giving up on the pump, I changed doctors and the new one gave me the medication I had been before.

On my last visit, he said a new law requires patients on pain meds to have no more than the equivalency of 90mg of morphine.  Then he cut my dose in half.  I am now in agony and can see why people would turn to other ways of getting relief or decide to end it all. 

I love life and have many reasons to live. I care for a grandchild who had nearly been lost to foster care. Now, due to my inability to get around very well, I may not be able to continue taking care of her. 

DEBBIE DUKE

DEBBIE DUKE

I can't bear to think of it. 

Why are they being so cruel to those of us who are law abiding, while the crooks get away with it?  When someone grabs grandma's meds from her purse or medicine cabinet, why is that grandma’s fault? 

Overdoses have been around for years and years. Who did we blame?  The one who stuck the needle in their arm, that's who.  Yes, we have a drug epidemic, but do something about the drugs coming across our borders. There has been enough squeezing of patients. Give them what works for them.  It sickens me to see patients treated unjustly turning to other ways to help themselves.

I'm truly afraid that everything in my life as I know it will end.  Thanks to irrational politicians who have taken away our right to be as free of pain as possible.

I think sometimes about what will be said in the future.  We'll be saying, “Remember the days when we were able to have pain relief and no one had to suffer?”

I know that people are dying, but to equate prescriptions with illegal drugs to make some political point is wrong. I wish those that are in pain could march down Pennsylvania Avenue. But we are too sick for that. 

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Debbie Duke lives in Florida.

Pain News Network invites other readers to share their stories with us. Send them to editor@painnewsnetwork.org.

The information in this column should not be considered as professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. It is for informational purposes only and represents the author’s opinions alone. It does not inherently express or reflect the views, opinions and/or positions of Pain News Network.

FDA Order Stops Production of Medtronic Pain Pump

By Pat Anson, Editor

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has filed a court order against medical device maker Medtronic ordering it to cease production and distribution of its SynchroMed II pain pumps.

Defects in the surgically implanted pumps, which are used to treat patients with chronic pain, cancer and severe muscle spasms, have been blamed for over a dozen deaths. The devices either lost power or inadvertently injected patients with too much or too little medication. The pump delivers analgesic drugs directly to the spinal fluid of pain patients.

Under the FDA's consent decree with Medtronic, the company will stop production of the SynchroMed II pump at its manufacturing plant in Columbia Heights, Minnesota. Medtronic will also retain a third-party expert to help develop and submit plans to the FDA to correct manufacturing and design problems. The consent decree will remain in effect until the FDA has determined that Medtronic has met all the provisions of the consent decree.

The FDA first approved the SynchroMed II pumps in 2004. Between 2006 and 2013, FDA investigators conducted five inspections at Medtronic’s production facilities, resulting in three warning letters notifying the company of major violations. The violations included inadequate processes for identifying quality control problems, failure to document design changes, and failure to ensure that finished products meet design specifications.

“The FDA expects that all patients will be treated with safe, effective and high-quality medical devices,” said Jan Welch, acting director of the Office of Compliance in the FDA’s Center for Devices and Radiological Health. “We will continue to stop distribution of devices made by firms that fall short of regulatory requirements.”

Over 200,000 SynchroMed pumps have been implanted worldwide, according to Medtronic, but the devices are not being recalled. Patients who experience a sudden change in their pain levels or hear a device alarm are being urged to contact their physician immediately.

“The agreement does not require the retrieval of any Medtronic products. With this announcement there is no new information to share about the safety and performance of the SynchroMed drug infusion system. Patients with the SynchroMed drug infusion system do not need to change their current course of therapy, have the pump removed, or take any other action as a result of this agreement,” the company said in a statement.

"We are committed to the highest level of quality, and have pursued significant efforts in recent years to enhance the performance of the pump and to address the FDA`s expectations," said Tom Tefft, senior vice president and president of Neuromodulation, which is part of the Restorative Therapies Group at Medtronic.