Don’t Take Away Our Medicine

By Lynn Joyce, Guest Columnist

I am a 62-year-old woman who -- aside from my intensely painful back --- enjoyed a full life of work, swimming, going to the gym, outings to various places with my husband and friends, and running my household.

A few years ago, my back pain became so severe I had to move from my primary care doctor to pain management after all the solutions we tried, including physical therapy, various pain treatments, x-rays and MRIs could not diagnose or in the end treat me. I went to a doctor in Sarasota who gave me pain medicine. which helped a little. I also had several procedures under anesthetic, which again did not totally relieve the pain.

I was desperate, as I spent much of the day and night with ice packs on my back to ease the pain. My ordinary life went down the drain, my husband got fed up with me not being able to accompany him and looking after my home went downhill.

I cried as I went to bed early with a sleeping pill to take away the pain -- though this did not always work as the pain woke me up. I tried various types of pain medicine and the one that worked best was oxycodone.

Nearly a year ago my doctors finally found a combination of drugs that made me pain free and able to resume my normal life. I was ecstatic to be able to do all the things I enjoyed again and to be able to run my home and look after my family.

I then had a shock a month ago when my doctor told me that my medicine would have to be reduced. I had two tearful visits to his office, where he told me that starting July 1st I would receive only one oxycodone a day.  

 LYNN JOYCE

LYNN JOYCE

My doctor knows that this is not even a therapeutic dose and yet is being forced to break his sacred oath to "First do no harm." After getting my life back, I was so upset that I would have to go back to my previous existence, where every day is full of pain and there is very little joy.

I am not a drug addict. I am a person that needs medication for a condition that curtails my enjoyment of life, just as much as another person who needs a drug to alleviate their condition or keep them alive. My doctor should be allowed and supported in the care of his patients, not vilified by government and media alike.

There are legitimate people who are truly suffering and need the medication that is being taken from them. I am one of these people -- the other side of this so-called crisis – and we are being ignored and used as scapegoats by the government.

I do not understand how such arbitrary, draconian laws can be passed in a modern society. This government’s heavy-handed solution to the "opioid crisis" is targeting the wrong people. We are not the ones selling drugs like fentanyl and heroin, we are just people with an illness. We are not lawbreakers, although some of us may be driven to escape the pain with illegal drugs or, in some tragic cases, suicide.

There are studies that totally refute the reasoning behind these opioid laws and guidelines, doctors who have tried to stop this from happening to their patients, and those who know the science and social reasons that show we are not the cause. We are not out there selling our drugs or "doctor shopping."

I see and read daily about politicians and stores that are jumping onto the false bandwagon to further their own careers and profits. Pharmacies that are too afraid or are taking a false moral stance about the prescriptions they will or won't fill.

There has been mishandling of prescriptions in the past, but systems have been put in place to remedy that. Yet the media screams about this person or that who has overdosed and stores like Walmart that will limit a person’s medication to seven days. I hope there are the few that get opioids for short term use if they need it, but they are not long-term pain sufferers who need their therapeutic doses daily to ameliorate their pain.

I have read that companies are being forced by the DEA to reduce their drug production so much that there are worries about hospitals not having enough to treat patients or with surgeries being delayed.

Those of us that need long term drug treatment are your family member, a friend, or a familiar stranger like the postal worker who you see every day. We are not the archetypal addict that people think of when the words “drug user” comes up. Think of a time in your life when you or someone you care about was in pain and were helped by medication to make it go away.

We have that pain every day and it doesn't go away without our medicine. The government or anyone else in a position of power who keeps on pushing this inhumane agenda should walk in our shoes for a day.

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Lynn Joyce lives in Florida.

Pain News Network invites other readers to share their stories with us. Send them to editor@painnewsnetwork.org.

The information in this column should not be considered as professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. It is for informational purposes only and represents the author’s opinions alone. It does not inherently express or reflect the views, opinions and/or positions of Pain News Network.