FDA Clears New Wearable Device for Migraine

By Pat Anson, PNN Editor

A neuromodulation device worn on the arm and controlled by a smartphone has been cleared by the Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of acute migraine. The Nerivo Migra device was developed by Theranica, an Israeli medical technology company, and is expected to be available in the U.S. later this year.

The FDA’s market authorization is based on the results of a double-blind, placebo-controlled study of Nerivo Migra involving 252 migraine patients at 12 headache clinics in the U.S. and Israel. The study findings were recently published in Headache: The Journal of Head and Face Pain.

Over two-thirds of patients who wore the device for 30-45 minutes during a migraine attack experienced pain relief two hours after treatment, compared to only about a third of those who wore a sham device. For many, the pain relief was sustained 48 hours after treatment.

THERANICA IMAGE

THERANICA IMAGE

"The results of the study demonstrate a high efficacy ratio for single as well as multiple attacks, both at two and 48 hours after treatment," said lead investigator Dr. Brian Grosberg, MD, director of the Hartford Healthcare Headache Center in Connecticut.

Placed on the upper arm, Nerivio Migra uses smartphone-controlled electrical pulses to disrupt pain signals. At this time, the device is only indicated for acute treatment of migraine with or without aura in adult patients who do not have chronic migraine. But company officials say it shows potential as a treatment for other pain conditions.

"We have identified at least 7 different painful conditions that may be relieved by this non-invasive, drug-free technology after appropriate clinical development," said Alon Ironi, CEO and co-founder of Theranica. "While the company is preparing to launch the Nerivio Migra in the United States market later this year at an affordable price, we remain committed to continuing our clinical development, expanding the use of remote electrical neuromodulation therapy for additional indications.”

Theranica has not disclosed what its “affordable price” will be. Over the next four months, the company said it would begin a series of clinical studies of Nerivo Migra at 30 headache clinics in the U.S. to assess patient selection and correct product use.

A handheld neuromodulation device – called gammaCore –  is currently available for about $600 to treat migraine and cluster headache.  Another device used to treat migraine – called Cefaly – is worn on the head and costs about $350. A new class of injectable migraine drugs is even more expensive, costing about $7,000 a year or $580 for each monthly dose.

"Over the last 20 years my colleagues and I have used triptans and ergots for acute migraine treatment. There is a large unmet need for new treatments in this population when these medications are not effective, are contra-indicated, or have non-tolerable side effects,” said Stephen Silberstein, MD, a member of Theranica’s medical advisory board.

“In addition, triptans and most current acute migraine medications, including over-the-counter drugs indicated for migraine, are associated with medication-overuse headache, which is associated with increased frequency of migraine attacks, and often results in chronic migraine.”

Migraine affects a billion people worldwide and about 36 million adults in the United States, according to the American Migraine Foundation. In addition to headache pain and nausea, migraine can cause vomiting, blurriness or visual disturbances, as well as sensitivity to light and sound. Women are three times more likely to suffer from migraine than men.

Shades of Grey

By Mia Maysack, PNN Columnist

A blonde walks into the mall, minding her own business, and sits down at a table in the food court.

A random dude calls out, "Don't you know it's rude to keep sunglasses on in here?"

That line felt like a punch to me.

"Well good sir, what can I say? My migraine lacks proper manners."

Yes, I wear sunglasses indoors because I'm cool like that. But it's also because after living with persistent and debilitating head pain for almost two decades, I need to wear sunglasses as a shield against the brutal assault of fluorescent lighting.

And sunglasses are one of the few ways I can make my seemingly non-existent illness visible to the rest of the world.  

There are specially designated migraine glasses that provide relief by strategically dimming light. Brightness levels on cell phones and other devices can also be turned down by a special app that filters blue light.   

Despite these helpful tools, walking under the bulbs in any public place feels as though light is raining down on me and, like a sponge, absorbing all of my energy.

That is why a trip to the grocery store could go well, but afterwards I'm out for the count and barely able to make it up the stairs.

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Within the last couple years, my mobility has continued to be compromised -- especially when it comes to either sitting (driving) or shifting positions (sitting to standing). At a conference recently, after noticing my navigation or lack thereof, a dear colleague suggested what I had been silently dreading: the possibility of using a cane. There's nothing wrong with canes, I'm grateful for all medical devices, but suffice to say they aren’t exactly what I had pictured at the ripe old age of 29.  

I've become accustomed to losing a lot as a result of chronic pain and illness, but confronting a limited physical future is my newest anguish.

The combination of chronic cluster headaches, daily intractable migraines and now fibromyalgia not only heighten the pain scale number, it hinders even the simplest of daily tasks. It impacts the few things I am still able to do that bring me joy, such as participate in creative body movement through yoga or dance.

I smirk thinking back to the days I could go out and dance for hours on end. There's a certain spark that comes alive in me when bass throbs its way through a loudspeaker. I'm quite aware that is contradictory to head pain, yet somehow, I cannot live without it. My soul begins to vibrate in the most calming way as I am enticed by the rhythm and it takes over.

Fast forward to today and I'm fortunate to get a couple minutes of dancing in before symptoms worsen. I cannot go as hard or as long as I used to, but it has caused an evolution in my movement, leading me to a whole-body present moment acceptance.  

Last week at an appointment, I mentioned that a cane will likely be needed daily in the near future. Initially the provider skipped over the remark entirely, but when I brought the conversation back around to ensure we were on the same page, she reacted with “Oh yes, your question about a cane.” 

I don’t recall needing an answer so much as an acknowledgement, as I do not feel the need to ask for permission to do what’s going to be best for myself. 

It’s never too far from my mind that I walked away from bacterial meningitis. If it is now catching up to me, there’s never an ideal time for that to happen and I am fortunate to have had moments with an abundance of blessings. No matter how dark life can get, it’s imperative we make the absolute most of every breath and make a conscious commitment for the sake of ourselves to never give up. 

Whether we live inflicted with physical ailments or not, none of us know what the future holds, nor when our number may be up. All it takes is a slight change in circumstance to alter our lives forever, so we must take time to appreciate and find ways to enjoy the gifts we have. 

The blonde kept the shades on and walked out with her cane like the bad ass that she is!      

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Mia Maysack lives with chronic migraine, cluster headaches and fibromyalgia. Mia is the founder of Keepin’ Our Heads Up, a Facebook support group, and Peace & Love Enterprises, a wellness coaching practice focused on holistic health.

The information in this column should not be considered as professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. It is for informational purposes only and represents the author’s opinions alone. It does not inherently express or reflect the views, opinions and/or positions of Pain News Network.

My Daily Persistent Headache

By Warren Cereghino, Guest Columnist

Waking up from my pre-work noontime nap one October day in 2007, I had a headache.  I still have it.

Thinking little of it at the time, I took two acetaminophen capsules (maybe Tylenol; maybe the generic from CVS or Costco) and headed off to work. 

I toiled nightly in a Los Angeles television station’s news department, where I was a news editor contributing to the nightly 10pm newscast.  I liked the work and didn’t mind the night schedule because it kept me out of mischief and off the streets.

That first night, the headache persisted.  And it just never stopped.  Over the next few weeks, I was gobbling pain relievers of one form or another every four hours, all the while trying to find the cause and a cure with all sorts of practitioners.

A little research taught me that this was known as “New Daily Persistent Headache.”  It sure as hell was persistent.

My journey took me to the offices of two different chiropractors who had successfully treated the persistent headaches of two referring friends (one was my daughter-in-law, who is a RN).  Both doctors tried, and both were unable to make it go away. 

Next, I tried acupuncture. That didn’t work, either. 

WARREN CEREGHINO

WARREN CEREGHINO

Meanwhile, I kept gobbling acetaminophen and ibuprofen like they were candy.  Determined to find the cause, I turned to neurologists. Two doctors who were with separate practices in Santa Monica evaluated me, had me undergo a scan and tried to figure it out, but to no avail.

By year’s end, I was still struggling with the debilitating effects of the headache and despairing of ever finding the elusive cause and cure. I had to face the fact that the only avenue open to me appeared to be pain management.  

In January 2008, I went to see David Kudrow, MD, whose neurology practice in Santa Monica specializes in pain management.  He treats patients and conducts research.  Dr. Kudrow gave me a thorough interview and then prescribed a nightly dose of 10mg of Elavil, an anti-depressant.

I cannot remember what he predicted in regard to when it would take effect, but a few weeks later I encountered a young man who’d grown up across the street from me and was now a practicing pediatric neurosurgeon.  He said he agreed with the prescription and told me it would take about a month to take effect.  He was right. 

Over the years, the dosage of Elavil (or its generic amitriptyline) has had to be increased, first from 10mg nightly and then to 20mg.  A couple of years ago Dr. Kudrow bumped it up again to 30mg nightly.

Recently he suggested I try to scale back to 20mg nightly. I tried, but it didn’t work. The 20mg dosage didn’t offer enough pharmacological firepower and I went back to 30mg after about ten days. 

Dr. Kudrow saved my life.  I have other health issues, but without his help in pain management I wouldn’t even be able to address the other issues of hypertension, diabetes and pre-clinical heart disease. I’m two months shy of turning 82 as of this writing.  Without Elavil, I would be dead.

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Warren Cereghino is a retired TV news producer, writer and editor who spent 55 years at TV stations in Phoenix, Sacramento, San Francisco-Oakland and Los Angeles.  Warren is a graduate of Arizona State and a military veteran who served during the Berlin Crisis of 1961. 

The information in this column should not be considered as professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. It is for informational purposes only and represents the author’s opinions alone. It does not inherently express or reflect the views, opinions and/or positions of Pain News Network.

Advocating for Migraine and Headache Research

By Mia Maysack, PNN Columnist

This week I had the privilege of attending the 12th annual “Headache on the Hill” lobbying event in Washington, DC, which is organized by the Alliance for Headache Disorders Advocacy (AHDA). This was my second time being involved and I plan to attend for as many years as possible.

Headache on the Hill is a two-day engagement that began with a briefing for over 160 advocates who traveled to Washington from around the country. This is when we heard from experts and learned how to strategize, focus on what we want to achieve, and get an opportunity to engage and ask questions.  

Early the next morning we had a headache policy forum breakfast and heard from Rep. Andy Harris, MD (R-Maryland), who lives with cluster headaches and is passionate about our cause.

“If we have to drag the federal government kicking and screaming into a modern age on treatment of pain syndromes, including headache pain syndromes, migraine, cluster headaches - we'll do it and I'll be there with you every step of the way," Harris said.

After breakfast, we all joined together to venture as a group to Congress to meet with our representatives and shares our stories on the struggles we face as migraine and headache sufferers.

ALLIANCE FOR HEADACHE DISORDERS ADVOCACY

ALLIANCE FOR HEADACHE DISORDERS ADVOCACY

Most important is the need of more funding for research on headache disorders. Only through research do we possess a chance at ever understanding all the layers of this complex medical problem.

Headache disorders affect more than 90% of Americans and cost the economy $31 billion every year in lost productivity, yet less than 1% of the budget for the National Institutes of Health (NIH) is spent on headache and migraine research.

We are not attempting to suggest that our cause is more worthwhile than others. We're merely pointing out that we are on severely unequal ground. How is it that so many millions of Americans are enduring migraines and headaches, yet it is the least funded field of medical research? 

We know that chronic migraine is the second leading cause of global disability and cluster headache has the deserved reputation of being "the most severe pain that humans can experience." I have endured both in some form every day for almost 20 years straight.

Is there a logical reason why 59% of Americans impacted by chronic migraine who seek refuge in emergency departments receive opioid medication? Opioids can worsen the severity and frequency of migraines. Meanwhile, we have to fight for other treatments such as oxygen therapy, which has been proven to assist in decreasing cerebral blood flow and lessen the pain of cluster headaches. Oxygen is natural, has no side-effects and is non-habit forming, which are the approaches the NIH should be investing in.

Breath work and mindfulness meditation have also changed the game for me personally and I am grateful to declare that discipline in those practices has led to an overall heightened sense of awareness, which actually helps me with coping.

We've recently been fortunate enough to have several injections introduced as preventative treatments for migraine. That’s a great start -- though many of us are unable to gain proper access to these expensive treatments due to our circumstances.

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The bottom line is that by showing up in D.C. and by advocating every chance we get in regular everyday life, we can make progress in raising awareness and funding for more research. Our efforts during Headache on the Hill were well received. Advocates from over 40 states attended, our meetings were empowering and there was empathy for our stories.

I am extraordinarily grateful to the members of Congress that made time to meet with us, the advocates who were alongside me for this adventure, and everyone who has or will participate in Headache of the Hill. 

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Mia Maysack lives with chronic migraine, cluster headaches and fibromyalgia. Mia is the founder of Keepin’ Our Heads Up, a Facebook support group, and Peace & Love Enterprises, a wellness coaching practice focused on holistic health.

The information in this column should not be considered as professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. It is for informational purposes only and represents the author’s opinions alone. It does not inherently express or reflect the views, opinions and/or positions of Pain News Network.

Stop Shaming Pain

By Mia Maysack, PNN Columnist

I've encountered and witnessed shaming several times in the pain community. It’s as if there was a contest to compare one pain to another.

I once shared a personal experience online about a specific treatment option and got ripped apart by people who disagreed.

Then came a debate pertaining to how to properly label my specific head pain. Due to the fact I have cluster headaches, yet also live in a constant state of migraine, I've used the term “migraine clusters.” That caused offense and was deemed incorrect. No one debating me came up with a proper label for my never-ending pain, so I'm still trying to figure that one out.

There are also questionable looks and inquiries about my health, because I don't have a wheelchair, visible cast or a gushing wound.

I've also encountered others describing their ailments, only to cut themselves off by saying, “Oh, but it's nothing like what you endure!"

Our experiences don’t have to be the same for them to be valid. That's a mind frame the world as a whole could do well to adopt.

There have been times I've partied in my own pity for far too long, but I've since learned that serves no positive or productive purpose past a certain point. Visit those feelings and then send them on their way. Don't allow them to unpack and live in your brain. I'm not preaching, this is just as much a reminder to myself as anyone else.

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We as human beings have all been through something that has changed us. A large portion of my life has been dedicated to the medical field. Nothing gave me a rush quite like having a full floor of patients that were well taken care of.  I used my career for a long time as a means of distraction from my own pain, because how couldn’t one get over themselves while constantly surrounded by people who have it much worse than you?

Newsflash to us all:  Whether in a hospital or walking around a park, there’s no possible way to know what someone is going through, feeling or what their circumstances have been up until the point your paths might cross.

We are all faced with hardships, some more than others, but pain is pain. Each individual is at a different place in their journey and each personal experience is unique.  This is a remarkable thing, because it provides a golden opportunity for us to learn from one another -- as opposed to having a ridiculous and unnecessary divide as we cater to the “I am offended” epidemic our world seems to be inching closer to by the day.

As an advocate and a person, my intent is never to cause insult. However, I am also not afraid to use my voice in an effort to get important conversations started. 

Having a difference of opinion is acceptable, but disrespect or tearing one another down is absolutely not.  Could we all at least agree that there's enough suffering already happening in our lives? Why contribute to it with each other? 

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Mia Maysack lives with chronic migraine, cluster headaches and fibromyalgia. Mia is the founder of Keepin’ Our Heads Up, a Facebook advocacy and support group, and Peace & Love, a wellness and life coaching practice for the chronically ill.

The information in this column should not be considered as professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. It is for informational purposes only and represents the author’s opinions alone. It does not inherently express or reflect the views, opinions and/or positions of Pain News Network.

Cannabis Gave Me Hope in My Darkest Hour

By Mia Maysack, PNN Columnist

I've lived most of my life with an ongoing migraine -- often trapped in a hazy brain fog induced by prescription medication.  

Suggestions of all kinds of alternatives have been made to me, including cannabis. But it wasn't until my very first headache cluster – which lasted 54 straight days -- that I gave in and the medicinal use of this miracle drug saved my life.

At that point, I hadn't slept in an inhumane amount of time, wasn't able to work, participate in life, or keep food and drink down. Then a friend literally begged me to "take a hit."

Call me a square, but I didn’t take a sip of alcohol until my 21st birthday and had never used marijuana or had the desire to.  What did I have to lose?

I had tried everything else. My arms were still bruised from IV's at the ER. So with absolutely no more craps to give, I lit up.  And almost instantaneously felt better.

I spent a lot of time battling shame for breaking the law and the stigma of marijuana use. But I've evolved to accept my truth. Marijuana is not a gateway drug, unless a person makes the choice to escalate their substance use. No treatment option is meant to be approached as a cure, nor should it be a crutch.   

Marijuana can be ingested in multiple ways, there are countless strains and products without the THC itself -- although that's the key element that eases my ailments. It helps me combat nausea, cultivate an appetite, gives a slight boost in morale, and get quality rest.  

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Cannabis works for me about half the time.  But that goes deeper than a glass half empty or half full.  It's a matter of having a resemblance of a life or not.   

There have been no overdoses or deaths reported from this natural plant. Over two dozen states, as well as our nation's capital, have adapted to the reality that it can be used as medicine.  It has saved and made A LOT of money, lowered criminal activity and rescued many others aside from myself.  

If someone had told me one day I'd be writing about marijuana for the world to see, I wouldn't have believed them.  But my public, unapologetic declaration is that cannabis provided a glimmer of hope during my darkest hour.  I share this not to promote it or advise anyone else, but because I want to raise awareness and demonstrate the courage to step out of your comfort zone.   

I've wounded relationships over this stuff, because not everyone can wrap their minds around it. I've also gotten in a bite sized amount of trouble over it -- munchie pun fully intended. It’s not for everyone but there are good reasons ill patients are being granted access to it. There’s research to support marijuana being helpful in attacking the opioid crisis, both for those struggling with addiction as well as those who are prescription dependent.    

How a person chooses to conduct themselves is a matter of free will. It has nothing to do with whether a CBD oil extract or pot brownie helps them get out of bed in the morning. It’s a matter of self-accountability and self-care. Cannabis saved my life.  

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Mia Maysack lives with chronic migraine, cluster headaches and fibromyalgia. Mia is the founder of Keepin’ Our Heads Up, a Facebook advocacy and support group, and Peace & Love, a wellness and life coaching practice for the chronically ill.

The information in this column should not be considered as professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. It is for informational purposes only and represents the author’s opinions alone. It does not inherently express or reflect the views, opinions and/or positions of Pain News Network.

Taking Control of My Disability Case

By Mia Maysack, PNN Columnist

This stack of papers may not look like much, but it is my medically documented life beginning in the year 2002.

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I personally highlighted them, so I can confidently report that the words “headache” and “migraine” are mentioned hundreds of times throughout.

I've been in the process of pursuing Social Security disability for about three years, which is not uncommon. Many have abused the system and there's also a high volume of claims being submitted and reviewed every day.

It took me a long time to even get to the point of filing for disability.

What does filing say about me as a person? Will I be judged? They probably won't even believe it. There are so many out there that need and deserve this more than me.

I still have those thoughts from time-to-time, even though my chronic migraines and cluster headaches have impacted every aspect of my life in a negative way – including employment.

I do not take the collection of denial letters I have received personally, as they've got to do what they can to weed out whoever isn't entirely legitimate. I know that I am, so I'll keep fighting.   

In recent months, another denial letter came. They acknowledged I am unwell but still deem me “well enough.” I decide to appeal immediately, as they only give you 60 days to do so. I also hired legal representation to help me through the process.

When I called them to check on the progress of my case, their tone felt dismissive. I would get put on hold before finishing a sentence or receive roundabout answers to basic questions. I’d also be reminded -- as if I wasn't already aware -- that disability court dates are scheduling 23 months from now.

I don't mind waiting, considering the fact I have no choice.  But it seemed as though I was being slow walked on a hamster wheel and not moving forward at all. This week I chose to contact Social Security directly and they informed me that, according to their records, there is no appeal on file for me at this time.

What does this mean, exactly?  In short, my legal representatives have not been covering their responsibilities to me as their client. I've been scraping by with 26 cents to my name while relying on their word, which I've now been convinced means next to nothing. 

I asked a Social Security representative what my next steps should be to take control and clean up this mess. He instructed me to visit their website and file an online appeal, which has since been done. Since I can’t account for where exactly all the paperwork I've been sending to my "help" has been going, I plan to stop in my local Social Security office to hand my stack of medical records directly to them.

We are our own best advocates, but how do I advocate for myself?  This is one way. I am the one who knows and understands the extent of how this debilitation has derailed just about every goal or dream I've set my sights on. But I won’t let that define me. I am more than my illness and won't allow my case to be dismissed.

I'm aware that representing myself may very well set this process back even further, but I've come to the realization that if we want something done right, we've got to make it happen ourselves.

At first, I felt disheartened because this seems like a full-time job in itself. But when others do not hold up their end, I now see this as an opportunity to raise awareness, address policy, educate and ultimately claim ownership of my own life. Now and in the future.

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Mia Maysack lives with chronic migraine, cluster headaches and fibromyalgia. Mia is the founder of Keepin’ Our Heads Up, a Facebook advocacy and support group, and Peace & Love, a wellness and life coaching practice for the chronically ill.

The information in this column should not be considered as professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. It is for informational purposes only and represents the author’s opinions alone. It does not inherently express or reflect the views, opinions and/or positions of Pain News Network.

Learning to Cope With Loss

By Mia Maysack, PNN Columnist

There has never been an employment situation that has not been impacted by my chronic migraines, fibromyalgia and other health conditions. I'm a worker bee but pushing myself too hard for too long while trying to keep up has resulted in my inability to pursue aspirations that are not physically feasible.

The realization of not being able to live up to who you feel like you are is a tough one. A person cannot refrain from asking: What is wrong with me?

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All the while, outsiders ask the same question, most with a hinge of disbelief pertaining to "invisible illness."

She looks and seems fine. Is anything really wrong with her?

In that regard, I've chosen to no longer stress over occasionally needing to wear my sunglasses indoors.

At least people can see those!

It can be a difficult concept to understand, how someone can seem fine one day, then be bedridden for the duration of any given week. Things we may have been able to do, even just the day before, vary moment by moment.

I’ve sensed an undertone of judgement regarding what taking proper care of myself looks like. A few examples of what I mean: 

“Must be nice to lie around in bed all day!”

“You’re still sick?”

“I have headaches too, but still manage to….”

In an effort to alleviate the pressure of these expectations, I've gotten to the point that I do my absolute best to avoid making commitments or plans. I only make them with those who understand my need for sudden disappearances, last minute cancellations, awkward positioning and random yoga stretches.

One of the greatest gifts I've ever given myself is taking good care of and putting myself first. Despite what seems to be a popular belief, that doesn’t mean trips to a day spa or an exotic beachfront. Pursuing self-care for me is the difference between being somewhat functional or a dungeon dweller.

Every time my health interferes with whatever I had my sights on, it’s like ripping gauze off a wound that’s not yet healed. It reopens its own spectrum of painful emotions, often leading to guilt over missing out and all those our absence is impacting. It’s a double-edged sword in a battle I seemingly cannot win.

It can be frustrating, but inward compassion is imperative. Think of it this way: When we know someone we care about is feeling unwell, what do we do? We offer support, advise them to rest, take the time they need, and do whatever is necessary for the sake of their health and healing.

We as chronic pain warriors deserve the same compassion, empathy, respect and self-care. I've learned over the years that forgiveness, patience and grace for ourselves is just as important as having that capacity for others.  

My experience has mostly been a lonesome one. Never once have I had a medical professional ask me how I am coping with these heavy burdens that are anticipated to be lifelong. I have still not been able to fully comprehend the gravity of what that diagnosis means.

It has been an excruciating process to get to where I am now. There's no guide book for this stuff, we gotta just keep trying until we find a way to make all of this serve us -- as opposed to the other way around.

I prefer now to find the positive in changes as they come, not worry about them until they do, and neglect the urge to over-analyze them long after they've arrived.  For me, it’s all about finding the joy, beauty and blessings in the given. There is always something to be appreciated and admired.

We must remain true to ourselves, even through and despite the turmoil of chronic pain. It may not reflect the vision we once had, but there’s no need to look back.  We are not headed in that direction anymore.  

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Mia Maysack lives with chronic migraine, cluster headaches and fibromyalgia. Mia is the founder of Keepin’ Our Heads Up, a Facebook advocacy and support group, and Peace & Love, a wellness and life coaching practice for the chronically ill.

The information in this column should not be considered as professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. It is for informational purposes only and represents the author’s opinions alone. It does not inherently express or reflect the views, opinions and/or positions of Pain News Network.

A Pained Life: Torn Between Hope and Fear

By Carol Levy, PNN Columnist

Tonight, I feel like the character Pushmi-pullyu from Doctor Dolittle. You know, the animal that has a head at both ends; one head pulling to go to the right, the other head raring to go to the left.

I’m also feeling torn between hope and fear.

Although I have trigeminal neuralgia, which is not a headache, I am going to be admitted tomorrow to the headache inpatient unit at one of the city hospitals.

The treatment I will receive is a 24-hour a day IV lidocaine drip, for 4 to 5 days.

Many years ago, I had lidocaine infusions but they were for only 3 to 4 hours each time. I tried it a few times, a few weeks apart, but there was never any benefit. On the upside, there were also no side effects.

“doctor dolittle”

“doctor dolittle”

As I read the information online about getting lidocaine for a protracted period, I am getting nervous. Hallucinations? Uh oh. I don't think so. That scares me.

I already know about the potential heart risks. The doctor told me I will have to be tethered to a heart monitor the whole time as a precaution. A sudden drop or increase in blood pressure, unconsciousness and even seizures are possible.

I did not know about the potential for deep vein blood clots until I read the information the clinic sent me. I will have to wear anti-clot stockings the whole time.

There is a list of other “moderate” and “mild” side effects: a metallic taste, tinnitus (ringing in the ears), lightheadedness, agitation, drowsiness, problems focusing, slurred speech, and numbness of the mouth and tongue.

The more serious side effects worry me. Nothing happened when I tried lidocaine the other times, but maybe having it 24 hours a day for a few days in a row vs. 3 to 4 hours every few days makes a difference.

That’s where the Pushmi-pullyu comes from. I do not know if I want to do this.

This will be the first time in the last 13 hospitalizations where I will not be going in for brain surgery to treat my trigeminal neuralgia. I have to admit, there is probably an unconscious aspect of feeling as though I am allowing myself to do one more potentially really dangerous procedure, like another surgery, and I am putting that feeling of danger on the lidocaine.

On the other hand, the reason to go ahead is pure and simple. Bathing the nerves in anesthetic for 72 hours, maybe slightly longer, makes sense to me. The nerves will be numbed or at least calmed down. How can that not work?

My bags are packed. I'm ready to go.  So once again, hope wins out over fear.

Is that a good thing or bad? I won't know for a few days, but I wonder if instead of Pushmi-pullyu for those of us in pain, it should be Fearmi-hopeyu -- with the “hopeyu” being the stronger of the two.

(10/23/18 update: Carol reports the lidocaine infusion did relieve her pain for a while, but by the 3rd day, “I had some bad reactions that altered my reality perception, not what I would think of as hallucinatory but close cousin so we had to stop it.” Carol says she is very disappointed by the outcome, but it was “definitely worth the trying. And thank you to all who asked.”)

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Carol Jay Levy has lived with trigeminal neuralgia, a chronic facial pain disorder, for over 30 years. She is the author of “A Pained Life, A Chronic Pain Journey.” 

Carol is the moderator of the Facebook support group “Women in Pain Awareness.” Her blog “The Pained Life” can be found here.

The information in this column should not be considered as professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. It is for informational purposes only and represent the author’s opinions alone. It does not inherently express or reflect the views, opinions and/or positions of Pain News Network.

A Beautiful Catastrophe

By Mia Maysack, PNN Columnist

Having lived my last 18 years with chronic migraines, I have my fair share of headache and migraine "poses." Yet I must admit, they're never as glamorous as what one can find in a fashion magazine. 

There’s a trend in the world of fashion to direct photo shoots in a way that brings attention to the structure of the model’s face or to exaggerate their make-up. They often to do this by framing a model’s face as if they’re experiencing head pain.

This has become known as the “migraine pose” or “headache pose” and they recently caused quite a stir on Instagram and Twitter among those that truly endure these ailments.

“If you don’t have migraine disease please don’t use #migrainepose,” a poster warned a makeup artist who shared some of her work.

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“Wow. Talk about insensitive to true migraine sufferers. Migraines look nothing like this primped model. AWFUL,” wrote another.

“Please admit your ignorance to migraine disease and show your support by instead posting a picture for #shadesformigraine. Help teach others that diseases of any kind should not be mocked,” said another migraine sufferer.  

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I don’t look like any of these models when I have a bad migraine. Ordinarily, I may be hooked up to an IV machine due to severe dehydration or I might be kneeling to the porcelain Gods attempting to combat overwhelming nausea.

There's also light and sound sensitivity, dizziness, vision disturbances, vomiting and fatigue. I describe my pain as a continuous “brain freeze” or feeling like my head was slammed against a wall.

Here are six poses that I have when I go through various stages of defeat, despair, distress, misery, grief and agony.

My most infamous pose of all? I'm nowhere to be found because I remain barricaded in a pitch black, silent room as I pray for the strength not to lose that last shred of sanity I have left and resist the urge to put an end to all of this already.

That image isn't sexy enough to sell magazines, is it? Nevertheless, that's the reality that millions of Americans are forced to live with and there is absolutely nothing pretty about it. 

When experiencing that level of discomfort, people are debilitated and focusing on any task can be impossible. To top it off, there is often no way of knowing how long an attack may last.

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Then there's the heavy emotions, such as guilt for missing out on things or feeling as though we are a burden and letting others down. And there’s the frustration and anger of being sick and tired of being tired and sick.  

People who are not experienced with enduring this type of pain likely don't stop to consider these things. Although we wouldn't wish this lifestyle on anyone, there is a priceless value and basic human need in being validated, acknowledged and understood. We need a pose for that.  

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Mia Maysack lives with chronic migraine, cluster headaches and fibromyalgia. Mia is the founder of Keepin’ Our Heads Up, a Facebook advocacy and support group, and Peace & Love, a wellness and life coaching practice for the chronically ill.

The information in this column should not be considered as professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. It is for informational purposes only and represents the author’s opinions alone. It does not inherently express or reflect the views, opinions and/or positions of Pain News Network.