1 in 4 Counterfeit Pills Have Lethal Dose of Fentanyl

By Pat Anson, PNN Editor

Illicit drug users who buy prescription pills online or off the street are playing a dangerous game of Russian Roulette, according to a new laboratory analysis by the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration.

The DEA found that about one of every four counterfeit pills (27%) have a potentially lethal dose of fentanyl, a synthetic opioid that is 80-100 times stronger than morphine.

Counterfeit pills laced with illicit fentanyl are appearing across the country and have been linked to thousands of deaths. Many of the overdoses involve blue pills stamped with an “M” and a “30” – distinctive markings for 30mg fake oxycodone tablets known on the street as “Mexican Oxy” or “M30.”

Based on a sampling of 106 tablets seized nationwide between January and March 2019, the DEA found that 29 of the pills contained at least 2 mg of fentanyl, a potential lethal dose. At least one pill seized in California had 4.2 mg of fentanyl — more than twice a lethal amount.

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“Capitalizing on the opioid epidemic and prescription drug abuse in the United States, drug trafficking organizations are now sending counterfeit pills made with fentanyl in bulk to the United States for distribution,” said DEA Acting Administrator Uttam Dhillon. “Counterfeit pills that contain fentanyl and fentanyl-laced heroin are responsible for thousands of opioid-related deaths in the United States each year.”

The DEA laboratory analysis found fentanyl in 21% of the heroin samples tested. Fentanyl is often added to illicit drugs to boost their potency.

‘Enough to Kill Entire Population of Ohio’

In recent months, there have been outbreaks of fentanyl-related overdoses around the country. Law enforcement agencies are also seizing larger amounts of fentanyl from drug traffickers.

In September, DEA agents found a pill press and five pounds of pure fentanyl in a San Diego apartment. Prosecutors said that was “enough to kill the city of San Diego” or about 1.5 million people.

That seizure was overshadowed a few weeks later, when 45 pounds of suspected fentanyl were seized in Montgomery County, Ohio. A Homeland Security agent said that was "enough to kill the entire population of Ohio, many times over."  

Public health officials in Seattle recently warned about a spike in fentanyl-related overdoses that killed at least 141 people in King County, including several teenagers. Parents and students are being warned in public service announcements not to consume any pill not directly obtained from a pharmacy or prescriber.

Last week health officials in Virginia predicted the state would have a record number of drug overdoses in 2019. Most of the 1,550 projected overdoses involve illicit fentanyl.

As in other parts of the country, fentanyl related deaths have surged in Virginia, while overdoses involving prescription opioids have remained relatively flat for over a decade.

“In 2015 statewide, the number of illicit opioids deaths surpassed prescription opioid deaths. This trend continued at a greater magnitude in 2016, 2017, and 2018,” the Virginia Department of Health said in its latest quarterly report. “There has not been a significant increase or decrease in fatal prescription opioid overdoses.”

Fentanyl Overdoses Spike in Seattle

By Pat Anson, PNN Editor

Public health officials in the Seattle area are warning about a spike in fentanyl-related overdoses that have killed at least 141 people in King County since June. As in other parts of the country, many of the deaths involve counterfeit oxycodone pills laced with illicit fentanyl.

Three of the recent overdose victims in King County are high school students who took blue counterfeit pills stamped with an “M” and a “30” – distinctive markings for 30mg oxycodone tablets that are known on the street as “Mexican Oxy” or “M30.”

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“Teenagers who are not heroin users are overdosing and dying,” said Brad Finegood of Public Health – Seattle & King County. “Do not consume any pill that you do not directly receive from a pharmacy or your prescriber. Pills purchased online are not safe.”

Gabriel Lilienthal, a 17-year-old student at Ballard High School in Seattle, died Sept. 29 from a fentanyl overdose.

“Gabe died from a fake OxyContin called an M30,” the teen’s stepfather, Dr. Jedediah Kaufman, a surgeon, told The Seattle Times. “With fentanyl, it takes almost nothing to overdose. That’s really why fentanyl is a death drug.”

Fentanyl is 50 to 100 times more potent than morphine. It is prescribed legally to treat severe pain, but in recent years illicit fentanyl has become a scourge on the black market, where it is often mixed with heroin and cocaine or used in the production of counterfeit pills. Illicit drug users often have no idea what they’re buying.

As PNN has reported, counterfeit oxycodone pills laced with fentanyl are appearing across the country and have been linked to hundreds of deaths. Yet this emerging public health problem gets scant attention from federal health officials, who are currently focused on an outbreak of lung illnesses associated with vaping that has resulted in 18 deaths.

‘Enough to Kill San Diego’

In San Diego last month, DEA agents found five pounds of pure fentanyl in the apartment of Gregory Bodemer, a former chemistry professor who died of a fentanyl overdose. Prosecutors say that amount of fentanyl was “enough to kill the city of San Diego” or about 1.5 million people.

Also found in Bodemer’s apartment was carfentanil, an even more powerful derivative of fentanyl, along with a pill press, powders, liquids and dyes used in the manufacture of counterfeit medication.  

Bodemer’s body was found in his apartment Sept. 27. Rose Griffin, a woman who also overdosed at the apartment and recovered, has been charged with drug possession and distribution.

Bodemer was an adjunct chemistry professor at Cuyamaca College in 2016. He had previously worked as a chemistry instructor at the U.S. Naval Academy in Annapolis, Maryland.

Overdoses Linked to Fake Pain Pills Draw Little Attention

By Pat Anson, PNN Editor

A mysterious lung illness linked to marijuana vaping has drawn nationwide attention this week. The CDC said there were 6 confirmed deaths and 380 cases of the illness, which one doctor warned was “becoming an epidemic.”

Even the White House has gotten involved in the vaping crisis, with President Trump calling for a ban on flavored e-cigarettes. “People are dying with vaping,” Trump said.

Meanwhile, an even more deadly health crisis continues to spread, drawing relatively little attention from the nation’s media and federal officials. Counterfeit blue pills made with illicit fentanyl are killing Americans from coast to coast.

This week, health officials in California’s Santa Clara County announced that 9 fatal overdoses have been linked to counterfeit oxycodone pills since January, including the recent deaths of a 15 and 16-year old.  

Local law enforcement has seized a large number of the blue tablets, which have an “M” stamped on one side and a “30” on the other side. They are virtually indistinguishable from real oxycodone.

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“The extent of circulation of these fake pills is unknown; however, they had been consumed by several of the people who died,” Santa Clara Public Health Director Sara Cody, MD, said in a statement. 

“Many opioid pills, which are made to look like real prescription medications, are now made by counterfeiting organizations. These pills are not prescribed, stolen, or resold by or from verified pharmaceutical companies, and there is no connection between their appearance and their ingredients. Many patients may not be aware of the risks of taking a pill that does not come directly from a pharmacy.”  

Mexican Oxy

The overdoses in Santa Clara County are not an isolated situation. Over 700 miles away, the Yakima County Coroner’s Office in Washington State warned that three recent deaths involved fake oxycodone pills with the same distinctive markings. Yakima is used as a major distribution center by Mexican drug cartels.

"Most of the time it comes from Mexico, but we haven't been able to pinpoint exactly which batch it's from and who is actually dealing it," said Casey Schilperoort, a spokesperson for the Yakima County Sheriff's Office.

Known on the street as “Mexican Oxy,” the pills were also found at the scene of four fatal overdoses near San Diego over the summer.  Ports of entry near San Diego are major transit points for counterfeit oxycodone smuggled in from Mexico. The pills are usually transported in vehicles, often by legal U.S. residents acting as couriers. They sell on the street for $9 to $30 each and have spread across the country.

In February, New York City police announced the seizure of 20,000 fake oxycodone pills. Overdose deaths in New York City are at record levels and fentanyl is involved in over half of them. Fentanyl is a synthetic opioid 50 to 100 times more potent than morphine.

This week federal prosecutors in Cleveland indicted ten people for trafficking in fake oxycodone and other illegal drugs. The leader of the drug ring, Jose Lozano-Leon, allegedly directed operations using a cell phone smuggled into his Ohio prison cell.

Prosecutors say Lozano spoke frequently with the co-defendants and others to arrange drug shipments from Mexico to northeast Ohio. The ring allegedly specialized in counterfeit oxycodone.

"In Ohio and other parts of the country, we are seeing an increase in these blue pills that at first glance appear to be legitimately produced oxycodone, but in fact are laced with fentanyl,” said DEA Special Agent in Charge Keith Martin.

Ironically, the indictments were filed in the same federal courthouse where a major lawsuit against opioid manufacturers and distributors is expected to get underway next month.  

Feds Warn of Counterfeit Oxycodone Deaths

By Pat Anson, PNN Editor

In the wake of four fentanyl overdoses in southern California, federal authorities have issued a public safety alert warning drug users about a lethal strain of counterfeit medication designed to look like 30mg oxycodone tablets.

The blue bills have the letter “M” in a box on one side and the number “30” with a line down the center on the other. On the street they are referred to as blues, M-30s or Mexican Oxy.

The pills were found at the scene of four fatal overdoses in San Diego County last week. The deaths in Poway, Santee, Lakeside and Valley Center were all reported within 24 hours.

Although tests on the pills are ongoing, authorities suspect they are laced with illicit fentanyl or carfentanil, which can be fatal in tiny doses.

SAN DIEGO SHERIFF’S DEPT. IMAGE

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“That heroin, that meth, that coke, that oxy you think you are taking? Well, it just might have fentanyl in it, and it just might be the last thing you ever do,” U.S. Attorney Robert Brewer said in a statement. “I cannot be more clear than this: Fentanyl may be the costliest drug you ever do, because you may pay with your life, and you won’t even know you took it.”

Brewer said border seizures, prosecutions and overdoses are on pace to hit all-time highs in San Diego County by the end of 2019. The Medical Examiner’s Office has confirmed 50 fentanyl-related overdose deaths so far this year, plus another 28 suspected but yet-to-be confirmed cases.

If the trend continues, the death toll could potentially reach 130, which would amount to a 47 percent increase over last year’s total of 90 deaths. The victims are overwhelmingly male, with the average age about 36.

“Just when we think it can’t get any worse, the latest numbers prove us wrong,” Brewer said.  “I am alarmed by the dramatic surge in trafficking activity and deaths, particularly of young people. San Diego is the fentanyl gateway to the rest of the country, and we are working hard to close that gate with interdiction, prosecution and education.”

Federal authorities have confiscated 1,175 pounds of illicit fentanyl – more than half a ton -- at or near the international border so far this year. In addition, there has been a record number of seizures involving counterfeit blue pills labeled M-30 that contain fentanyl. The pills sell on the street for $9 to $30 each and are appearing around the country.

Ports of entry near San Diego are major transit points for illicit fentanyl smuggled in from Mexico. The fentanyl is usually transported in vehicles, often by legal U.S. residents acting as couriers.

A recent report from the Wilson Center found that Mexican cartels are playing an increased role in the fentanyl trade.

San Diego is the fentanyl gateway to the rest of the country.
— U.S. Attorney Robert Brewer

“Chinese companies produce the vast majority of fentanyl, fentanyl analogues, and fentanyl precursors, but Mexico is becoming a major transit and production point for the drug and its analogues as well, and Mexican traffickers appear to be playing a role in its distribution in the United States,” the report found.

“Both large and small organizations appear to be taking advantage of the surge in popularity of the drug, which is increasingly laced into other substances such as cocaine, methamphetamine, and marijuana—very often without the end-user knowing it. To be sure, rising seizures of counterfeit oxycodone pills laced with fentanyl illustrate that the market is maturing in other ways as well.”

Last week a former Mexican police officer was indicted for fentanyl trafficking by a federal grand jury in Texas. Assmir Contreras-Martinez, 30, was pulled over by a Texas trooper on Interstate 40 in Amarillo in May. About 73 pounds of illicit fentanyl powder was found inside his 2007 Ford Explorer, enough to kill 10 million people, according to DEA experts. 

Contreras-Martinez admitted he was paid $6,000 to transport the fentanyl from California to Florida and that it was his second such trip. Before his unlawful immigration to the United States nine months ago, Contreras-Martinez had been employed for eight years as a municipal police officer in Cananea, Sonora, Mexico.